A Look at Season Tickets Around the NWSL

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With the NWSL season quickly approaching (no schedule available at the time of posting), it’s time to take a look at the different season ticket options around the league.

This year’s NWSL season features 12 games at the home field of each club (24 in total)—up from the 10 home game, 20 total games in 2016. Without the World Cup or the Olympics to break up the season, it’s likely to be more fluid than in years past.

Before we get into this, I want to make it clear, I am only looking at full season packages. No flex packs here.

Let’s start by taking a look at the league as a whole. 

Sidenote: I decided on what was “premium” and what wasn’t based on what was offered and other details. They sometimes match up with the club’s ideas and sometimes they do not. 

[table “6” not found /]

A few notes:

  1. A few clubs have supporter sections, but be warned the lower price sometimes comes with the drawback of being standing room only. More on that later.
  2. Both Chicago and Seattle offer 4-person tables at $3,000 and $3,600 respectively. So $750 and $900 a person. Not bad if you want field seats with food and drinks included. (We believe Seattle includes food and drink.)
  3. FC Kansas City and North Carolina Courage both had the most options under $200, with 3 each.
  4. Boston and Washington are the only teams with no options under $200.

Now here’s a look at the season ticket picture on a team-by-team basis:

The Boston Breakers

[table “7” not found /]

Upsides: 

  • The Breakers are consistent with what rewards you get. No locking lower level ticket holders out of events to get them to upgrade.

Downsides: 

  • Boston’s packages were the most expensive for all of the “non premium” options. But considering they are located in one of the most packed sports towns in the country, this isn’t totally out of line. 
  • If you wanted a cushioned seat you better be ready to give the Breakers $990 for it.

What I’d Buy: Category B Season Membership – $360


The Chicago Red Stars

[table “14” not found /]

Upsides:

  • The Red Stars give guaranteed seating to season ticket holders for the playoffs. It’s a nice touch for a team that is usually in the playoff hunt.
  • If you do go for the Fieldside VIP or the VIP Table, both come with waiter service.
  • 15% off Red Stars Merchandise is a great perk. 

Downsides:

  • The Harlem End / Local 134 Season Ticket section is standing room only. And the next option up is $80 more.
  • Because they don’t open all of the seating at Toyota Park, you are somewhat limited in what you are able to sit.

What I’d Buy: Sideline Club (126) – $320

Chicago Fire Comparable: Premier $595


FC Kansas City

[table “15” not found /]

Upsides:

  • Payment Plan options are always nice to see.
  • Ticket Exchange Program is a good option if you want the perks but might not make it to all the home games.
  • Again, a team usually in the playoff mix bringing up playoff tickets. Nice.

Downsides: 

  • While there are two packages under $180 you have to go to the $180 level not to be sitting on the grass or in the supporters section. And knowing the Blue Crew, they are going to be up and active all game (as a supporters group should).
  • You will have the sun in your eyes for a bit if you sit on the east side.

What I’d Buy: West Elite (109) – $264


The Houston Dash

[table “16” not found /]

Upsides:

  • Another team allowing for ticket exchange. Thumbs up.
  • Another team giving 15% off merch. Double thumbs up.
  • Any of the season ticket packages will get you on the Dash Season Ticket Member Ticket Wall, if you’re into that kind of thing.
  • I usually get nervous when I see the “..and more” but the Dash they seem pretty good at treating their fans well.
  • They give season ticket holders “inclusion in orange rewards loyalty program,” so that’s neat.
  • Actually, the Dash have the highest number of choices for season tickets.

Downsides: 

  • No one puts baby in the corner…except the Dash for General Admission. It’s not the end of the world, but it’s also not the best GA we’ve seen.
  • No upper bowl—again not the end of the world.

What I’d Buy: 100 Level East Sideline (127) – $276

Houston Dynamo Comparable:  100 Level Center Circle $980


North Carolina Courage

[table “17” not found /]

Upsides:

  • You might be wondering why I didn’t put the perks next to the tickets. That’s because the list is so long if I wrote it out for each level it would add over 25 inches to this already crazy-sized piece. Here they are:
    • North Carolina Football Club Membership
    • GA Parking included in all season ticket member packages
    • Choice of game day experience items
    • Have your child participate as a player companion
    • Pregame field visit
    • Special gift delivered to seat
    • Photo on the video board
    • Pregame clinic
    • Luncheon with the head coach
    • Meet & greet with team captain
    • Holiday card photo op
    • Seat upgrade ability on game day
    • Ceremonial coin flip/first kick/Starting XI photo
    • Merchandise or concessions coupon
    • Ability to purchase additional tickets at the season ticket member rate
    • Invitation to offseason winter party
    • Special access to NCFC and/or NC Courage preseason games
    • Season ticket member gift
    • Flexible interest free payment plan
    • Invitation to meet the team event
    • Dedicated NCFC ticket representative
    • 4+ Season Tickets receive VIP parking pass
    • Exchange unused tickets for any NCFC and NC Courage games (Specific to each team)
    • Voting rights and input on selected matters that primarily affect fan experience
    • Ability to donate unused tickets to charitable Kicks for Kids Night
  • “Voting rights and input on selected matters that primarily affect fan experience.” I’m pointing this one out because I am that impressed with it.
  • Luncheon with the head coach, meet & greet with team captain, holiday card photo op—also really nice.
  • Their base level covers a ton of seats. Really gives you options there.

Downsides:

  • No supporters section for the Courage (It’s in black on their guide) like for NCFC. Might come later, but it’s a small strike against them for now.

What I’d Buy: Premier / Terrage Midfield (107) – $276

NCFC Comparable: Premier / Terrage Midfield – $399


The Orlando Pride

[table “18” not found /]

Upsides:

  • Having the “ability to email your tickets to friends and family” is a nice feature for those who can’t make all of the games.
  • If you have the cash, the West Club gets you “a beautiful indoor, air conditioned space with reserved outdoor seating.” In the middle of a Florida summer, it might be worth the nearly $800.
  • Another team with playoff tickets on the brain.
  • A nice-sized supporters area, even if it is standing room only.

Downsides: 

  • Small downside, but if you like to sit up high, the upper part is not open.

What I’d Buy: Sideline E (32) – $240

Orlando City Comparable: Sideline East Field Level – Sold Out


The Portland Thorns

[table “19” not found /]

Upsides:

  • For $132 a season, Portland might be the best ticket in the NWSL. Portland is by all accounts a fantastic place to watch a game. Good atmosphere and good seats (no sitting on grass here).
  • Having preseason games included is a nice touch. Portland will be hosting a preseason set of games, and it’s looking like it may become an annual thing.

Downsides: 

  • Highest single ticket premium option. Though they get 13,000+ at every game, so the market will bear it.

What I’d Buy: Touchline Reserved (119) – $275

Portland Timbers Comparable: Sold Out


The Seattle Reign

[table “20” not found /]

Upsides:

  • A “Members only Stadium Entrance” can be nice to get in quickly.
  • One of the only clubs to include a scarf with the season ticket package.

Downsides: 

  • Seattle is hampered by where they play when it comes to ticket packages. But over $150 between “Upper Grandstand” and “Premium Grandstand” seems steep.
  • At $750 a person for the 4 person “Pitchside Experience,” it’s at the top end for most of the fieldside tickets.

What I’d Buy: Lower Grandstand – $264


Sky Blue FC

[table “21” not found /]

 

Upsides: 

  • Midfield Elite seats get backrests. 
  • If you are a fan of sitting with Supporter Groups, $155 for the base package is one of the lowest prices in the league.
  • Having been to the field before, I can say there aren’t many bad seats. Even in sections 1 and 9 seeing the full field isn’t as much of a problem as it can be in other places.

Downsides: 

  • They don’t list their perks on the website, that I could find.
  • The jump between their highest metal benches and field seats is sharp.

What I’d Buy: Supporters Bleachers (9) – $155


The Washington Spirit

[table “22” not found /]

Upsides:

  • The “Standard” covers a lot of the bleachers, so a lot of viewing options.
  • At least if you buy season tickets, the price will remain the same all season and not fluctuate like single game tickets will.

Downsides: 

  • Over $200 for the starter option is not ideal. Less so when it’s on grass.
  • If you want a backrest you have to pay premium price.

What I’d Buy: Standard (108) – $270

Sort by:   newest | oldest | most voted
Diane
Guest
As a STH who is not based in-market for any team, those teams who offer something tangible, like scarves or Red Stars exclusive STH gift, are especially appealing. I really liked the breakdown all in one place, let’s face it some team sites are a little challenging to navigate, especially some of the seating charts. I do think the teams could do a much better job of selling their perks on their sites if they put a little effort in. Having been a season ticket holder for what is the 5th year running it would be nice to get some… Read more »
oz
Guest
Group rates and packages would be an interesting add. Some teams rely on groups and youth league team packages to fill seats. Boston in particular comes to mind, since they practically gave tickets away to youth and college teams in 2016–and the Boston area has lots of both–and those fans were counted toward the team’s paid attendance. There seem to be a few missing perks, at least from the teams I’ve researched before: – Portland’s Key Bank, Root, and fieldside seats include complimentary food and drink. – Portland’s $440 Key Bank seats have the same climate controlled indoor/outdoor configuration and… Read more »
anon
Guest
It seems to me that this article would have been better served by some combination of calling each team’s front office to obtain concrete details on their season ticket packages AND possible additional perks available to each section (so that you don’t write something as vague as, “We believe Seattle includes food and drink,” instead of getting confirmation one way or another), and perhaps interviewing the associated supporters’ groups for each team for an actual analysis on a game day experience within these venues (and maybe some additional details that don’t necessarily get included on the team websites, such as… Read more »
RJ Allen
Guest

Thanks for reading.

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